John C. K. Daly

Dr. John C. K. Daly is a Eurasian foreign affairs and defense policy expert for The Jamestown Foundation and a non-resident fellow at the Central Asia-Caucasus Institute in Washington DC.

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Articles by John C. K. Daly

Kazakhstan to Host Offshore Yuan Center

Many observers both inside and outside Central Asia have noticed China’s rising economic influence there, supplanting the region’s traditional hegemon, Russia. In yet another sign of China’s growing economic clout

Russian, NATO Maritime Deployments Intensify off Syria

Despite differing political agendas in Syria’s ongoing civil war, Russia and the members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) are now sending significant naval forces to Syria’s Mediterranean coastline.

China, Belarus Deepen Ties

Two countries on opposite ends of Eurasia are drawing closer, courtesy of the skein of railways slowly snaking across this massive region in the form of an evolving “Iron Silk

Russia Shutters Northern Distribution Network

On May 15, Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev issued a resolution closing the Northern Distribution Network (NDN), a network of rail and road links across Russia and the post-Soviet space

Ukraine Conflict Benefits China

While Beijing officially supports Russia’s position on its annexation of Crimea, behind the scenes China is helping keep the battered Ukrainian economy afloat. On March 26, the Ukrainian government and

Caspian Summit Increases Russia’s Regional Power

On September 29, the presidents of the Caspian littoral states—Russia, Kazakhstan, Iran, Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan—attended the fourth Caspian Summit, held in Astrakhan (TASS, kremlin.ru, September 29). This year’s meeting of

The Islamic State’s Oil Network

The Islamic State, previously the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), has been a key focus of global attention for the past several months, becoming the number one terrorist

Turkmenistan Becoming Regional Railway Hub

Buoyed by its rising hydrocarbon revenues, Turkmenistan is using some of that income to reduce its geographical isolation by upgrading and expanding its railway network while linking it to those

Hot Issue: After Crimea: The Future of the Black Sea Fleet

Executive Summary Russia’s March 17 annexation of Crimea capped nearly two decades of increasingly fractious Russian-Ukrainian relations, punctuated by rising tensions over Russia’s lease of Sevastopol and natural gas transit

China’s Penetration of the Canadian Energy Market

China’s relentless global search for energy supplies has taken it from Central Asia to Sudan. But China imports oil from politically unstable nations such as inflation-ravaged Venezuela; Iran, constricted by

Is the End in Sight for Colombia’s FARC Insurgency?

Colombia’s Marxist Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC) began its armed struggle in 1964. Fifty years later, FARC representatives and Colombian government officials are negotiating in Havana in peace talks

Ukrainian-Russian Dispute Moves Into Cyberspace

Rising tensions between Russia and Ukraine have spilled into cyberspace, although it remains unclear whether government entities or lone wolf patriotic hackers are responsible. In a highly embarrassing incident, Russian

Russia’s Pacific Fleet Receives New Ships, Missions

Long the most neglected of the Russian Federation’s four fleets, the Pacific Fleet is receiving new equipment and participating in more international exercises as the administration of President Vladimir Putin

China and Kyrgyzstan Discuss Rail Projects

China is increasingly interested in railway construction in the former Soviet Central Asian states as a land alternative to maritime transit for shipping high-value, low-volume products such as electronics to

Kazakhstan, Israel Deepen Military Ties

On January 20, in Tel Aviv, Kazakhstan’s Defense Minister Adilbek Dzhaksybekov signed a military cooperation agreement with Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon formalizing military and defense industrial ties. It was

Brazilian and Russian Military Cooperation Deepens

According to Russia's Economic Development Ministry, Russia is negotiating to supply helicopters to the Forca Aerea Brasileira (Brazilian Air Force, or FAB). The Ministry noted in a statement, "In order

Turkey and EU in Trade Row over Boron

In Turkey's convoluted "long march" toward European Union membership, Ankara has exhibited immense patience during the accession process, which began 21 years ago, when on April 14, 1987, Turkey applied

Russia Dominates Tajikistan’s Energy Sector

In the new "Great Game" between the West and Russia over the vast energy reserves of Central Asia, Tajikistan has always stood apart, owing to its geographical isolation, degraded economy,

TURKEY PURSUES ITS OWN FOREIGN POLICY LINE

If there is one constant of Turkish foreign policy, it is that Ankara puts the nation’s interests first and foremost, which occasionally discomfits neighboring countries and allies, who believe that

MONGOLIA DEEPENS TIES WITH VIETNAM

As the triangular three-way new "Great Game" among Russia, the United States, and now China continues throughout Eurasia, an interesting byproduct is the bilateral relations developing between potential “client” states

KAZAKHSTAN WITHDRAWS TROOPS FROM IRAQ

The strategic seismic shockwave unleashed throughout the former Soviet Union by the August military confrontation between Georgia and Russia continues to reverberate throughout the Caucasus and Central Asia, as national

TURKEY COURTS CENTRAL ASIA

In the aftermath of the Georgian-Russian confrontation, Ankara sees an opportunity to expand its trade relations with Central Asia, particularly the rising petro-states of Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan. Seeking to capitalize

IRAN GAINS FROM GEORGIAN CONFRONTATION

In the aftermath of the August Georgian-Russian confrontation, a new Caspian geopolitical reality is slowly emerging from the fog of war. The clash highlighted the vulnerability of Western-funded and built

ERDOGAN GOES TO TURKMENISTAN

The military confrontation between Georgia and Russia in August highlighted the West's misconception that the Caspian energy transit through the Caucasian nation is a totally secure means of bypassing Russia

TURKEY ACTS AS CAUCASIAN PEACEMAKER

The armed military confrontation between Russia and Georgia over South Ossetia and Abkhazia in August has produced major shockwaves throughout the Caucasus and beyond. Amid the suffering, the military clash

TURKEY COURTS AFRICA

As American, European, and Asian governments and markets nervously contemplate the economic chaos of the past month, Turkey is quietly pressing forward with plans to increase its presence in the

BRITISH PETROLEUM AND ITS WOES WITH THE CPC

To paraphrase Queen Elizabeth, BP has had an "annus horribilis" in Eurasia. Its joint venture in Russia, BP-TNK, has been under attack by its Russian partners; and last month an

WALL STREET CHAOS AFFECTS TURKEY

The reverberations from the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers investment bank after its shares dropped more than 80 percent before the September 15 opening bell on the New York Stock Exchange

NAVAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE SOUTH OSSETIAN CRISIS

Last month’s confrontation between Russia and Georgia over South Ossetia had a maritime dimension that continues to expand. Russia deployed elements of its Black Sea fleet to Georgia’s coast during

TURKMEN WIND POWER

Since the death of Turkmenistan’s “president for life” Saparmurat “Turkmenbashi” Niyazov on December 21, 2006, energy companies from both East and West have been falling over themselves to get a

TURKEY AND THE PROBLEMS WITH THE BTC

With Western eyes fixed on the clash between Russia and Georgia over the disputed enclaves of South Ossetia and Abkhazia, the conflict is affecting neighboring countries’ oil shipments, particularly Azerbaijan

HIZB UT-TAHRIR AND U.S. ALLIES IN CENTRAL ASIA

As Tashkent and Washington move to repair relations that were downgraded after divergent interpretations of the tragic events in Andijan on May 12, 2005, the U.S. is seeking to reengage

LUKOIL AND TURKEY

As Europe frets over the political implications of Gazprom’s increasing presence in the EU market, another Russian energy company has quietly made an inroad into hydrocarbon-starved Turkey. On July LUKoil’s

CENTRAL ASIA’S WATER PROBLEMS SOAR DURING LONG SUMMER

One of Eurasia’s most intractable legacies dating from the 1991 implosion of Communism is how Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan transited their economies to national sovereignty after being constituent

ISRAELI-KAZAKH COOPERATION GROWS

Since 1991 Kazakhstan has pursued a multilayered foreign policy, juggling its evolving foreign initiatives from hydrocarbons to military cooperation with its former Communist master Russia through growing relationships with China

TURKEY PONDERS RUSSIAN MISSILE OFFER

As Turkey moves to upgrade its weapons systems, Ankara is considering all options and possible suppliers, including Moscow. The value of such runs into billions of dollars, generating intense competition,

SAUDI-RUSSIAN MILITARY COOPERATION

A simple, one-sentence Russian language news item published by Russia's Interfax on July 14 seemingly signals yet another tectonic shift in the Middle East's volatile mixture of oil, religion and

MONGOLIA HOLDS KHAN QUEST MILITARY EXERCISE

Since Mongolia abandoned Communism in 1990, it has sought to maintain its independence, sandwiched as it is between the two giant neighbors, Russia and China, by discreetly reaching out to

MONGOLIA RIOTS

Suspicions of a fraudulent election, combined with rampant inflation, low living standards and perceptions of widespread corruption have combined to create a perfect storm of protest in Mongolia’s capital Ulan

IRAN AND TURKEY ENERGY TIES DEEPEN

The United States has maintained various sanctions against Iran since 1979, implemented in aftermath of the seizure of the U.S. embassy in Tehran. As relations worsen between the U.S. and

TURKMEN FAMILIES RELOCATED FROM BORDER AREA

Since the death of Turkmenistan’s “President for Life,” Turkmenbashi (“father of the Turkmen”) Saparmurat Niyazov of an apparent heart attack on December 21, 2005, his successor, Gurbanguly Berdimukhamedov, has dismantled

TANKERS, PIPELINES AND THE TURKISH STRAITS

One of the most dramatic stories in a world facing record-high energy prices has been the relentless rise of Azeri, Kazakh and Russian Caspian oil exports from southern Russia since

TURKEY TO TAKE PART IN IRAQI OIL EXTRACTION

Along with five other nations, Turkey’s Turkiye Petrolleri Anonim Ortakligi (Turkish Petroleum Corporation--TPAO) has been included among state-owned countries that will be granted the right to extract oil in Iraq,

CENTRAL ASIAN WATER AND RUSSIA

They say that you can’t kill a good idea--or apparently a bad one, either. Moscow mayor and Putin silovik Yuriy Luzhkov has revived one of the USSR’s last and most

THE RISE OF AZERI SEAPOWER

The Caspian’s legal status has been in limbo since the 1991 collapse of the USSR. The Caspian is the world’s largest enclosed body of water, with a surface area of

AFGHAN-TURKMEN RELATIONS IMPROVE

Last month’s meeting between Afghan President Hamid Karzai and Turkmen President Gurbanguly Berdimukhamedov was more than a mere photo opportunity. The implications of deeper Afghan-Turkmen bilateral ties could have a

AKKUYU AND TURKISH NUCLEAR POWER

In an era of record-high oil prices, Turkey, which imports 90 percent of its energy needs, is considering any and all options, including nuclear. The country’s energy requirements are pitting

TURKEY EYES DEEPER ROLE IN SOUTHERN IRAQ

Of all Iraq’s neighbors, Turkey has the most intricate foreign policy toward the beleaguered nation, attempting to balance its concerns about the Kurdish PKK militants in northern Iraq with its

LITHUANIA AND KAZAKHSTAN PLAN COOPERATION PROJECTS

On May 13 Lithuanian Prime Minister Gediminas Kirkilas met with Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev and subsequently told reporters that Lithuania was seeking to deepen its energy cooperation and bilateral trade

TALKS ON NORTHERN CYPRUS RESUME

The issue of northern Cyprus has roiled Ankara’s foreign policy ever since July 20, 1974, when Turkey invaded the northern region of the island in “Operation Atilla,” a combined land,

AZERBAIJAN JOINS THE MIDDLE EAST

Azerbaijan's massive hydrocarbon resources have begun to attract the attention of an increasing number of energy-poor nations in the Middle East, including Israel and Jordan. While the logistical problems involved

POSSIBLE RAPPROCHEMENT BETWEEN ARMENIA AND TURKEY

Among the “frozen conflicts” left over from the implosion of the USSR in December 1991, the economic implications of Armenia’s 1988 to 1994 conflict with Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh are perhaps

TAJIKISTAN COMES IN FROM THE COLD

Of all the post-Soviet Central Asian “Stans,” Tajikistan has had the roughest path toward stability and prosperity. The year after the USSR collapsed in December 1991, Tajikistan descended into a

TURKEY HOLDS JOINT AIR FORCE EXERCISES WITH PAKISTAN

While American and European airspace is crisscrossed with commercial aircraft, Eurasia's airspace is increasingly resounding to the roar of military aircraft. Last week the Commonwealth of Independent States held its

KAZAKHSTAN AND MONGOLIA BROADEN RELATIONS

Since 1991 Kazakhstan has become one of the world’s rising petro-states. If current development plans are implemented, Kazakhstan’s current 1.3 million barrels per day (BPD) output will rise to 2.7

VENEZUELA BUYS RUSSIAN ARMS

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, Washington’s favorite Latin American bete noir after Fidel Castro, unsettled Washington again last year by negotiating a $1 billion deal with Moscow to purchase a number

IRAN AND TURKEY COOPERATE ON ELECTRICITY

In a move certain to raise hackles in Washington, Iran and Turkey have agreed to connect their electrical power grids. According to an amendment to the Electricity Market Law submitted

BASBUG IN INDIA

As Turkey broadens its military and economic contacts eastwards, it is now deepening its ties with a growing Asian superpower, India. On March 31 Turkish Land Forces Commander Gen. Ilker

TURKEY RISKS LOSING INTERNATIONAL FUNDS FOR ILISU DAM

When covering Turkey’s complex relationship with its Kurdish minority, Western media outlets have tended to focus on the military activities in southeastern Anatolia against the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK). The

GAZPROM MAKES INROADS INTO SOUTH AMERICA

On March 17 Gazprom International Business Department head Stanislav Tsygankov signed an agreement on natural gas exploration in Bolivia with Santos Ramirez, president of the Bolivian state-owned petroleum company Yacimientos

TURKEY WIDENS TRADE TIES WITH IRAN

Since March 2003 U.S.-Turkish relations have been strained over Iraq. Now Washington has an additional cause for disquiet, as Turkish-Iranian economic relations go from strength to strength, further weakening Washington’s

PAN-TURKISM TAKES STEP FORWARD IN EURASIA

Since the 1991 collapse of the USSR, the former Soviet republics, now independent nations, have regrouped in a variety of political and economic configurations. These include the Commonwealth of Independent

THE KOSOVA CONUNDRUM FOR TURKEY AND EURASIA

Since Kosova unilaterally declared independence on February 17, its action has caused a fissure in international reactions. Thirty states have now recognized Kosova’s independence, including the United States, Great Britain,

RUSSIA, AFGHANISTAN AND THE DRUG TRADE

Alarmed by the rise of opium cultivation in Afghanistan, Russia’s Federal Drug Enforcement Service has opened a permanent office in Kabul, Afghanistan. Federal Drug Enforcement Service Director Alexei Milovanov said

TURKEY RECOGNIZES KOSOVA OVER RUSSIAN PROTESTS

Yesterday, February 19, Turkish Foreign Minister Ali Babacan began a two-day official visit to Russia. The trip comes on the heels of Ankara’s recognition of Kosova’s declaration of independence, made

NATO EXPANSION IN THE BALKANS

While the issue of Ukraine’s possible entry into NATO is currently filling the European press, Macedonia is also facing the issue of accession. U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice met

ANKARA REASSURES NEIGHBORS ON WATER SHARING

While Turkey may become a foreign oil resource sometime in the future, decades of investment in hydroelectric power are now paying off, and the country is in the extraordinary position

MOSCOW LOSES BRAZIL SUBMARINE DEAL TO PARIS

In 2007 Russia became the world's second-largest arms exporter, exceeded only by the United States. As Moscow seeks out new markets, it is increasingly eyeing prospects in what Washington regards

BISHKEK EXPLORES OIL PROSPECTS

The relentless race to develop Central Asia’s energy reserves has now reached mountainous Kyrgyzstan. But as in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, and Turkmenistan, it seems that Russia has largely beat out its

THE REBIRTH OF PAN-TURKISM?

As the USSR recedes further into history, the post-Soviet Turkic nations of the Caucasus and Central Asia are rediscovering their linguistic and cultural affinities with Turkey, and activists are promoting

RUSSIA WANTS TO SELL GREECE WEAPONS AS WELL AS GAS

Following the defeat of German General Erwin Rommel’s vaunted Afrika Corps in North Africa in 1943, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill pressed for a subsequent Allied invasion of either Italy,

TURKMENISTAN, NATURAL GAS, AND THE WEST

What a difference a year makes. One of the final diplomatic triumphs of Turkmen leader Saparmurat Niyazov before his death last December was to renegotiate Turkmenistan's exclusive natural gas contracts

NAZARBAYEV HINTS AT LARGER STATE SHARE IN KASHAGAN

One of Vladimir Putin’s most notable accomplishments since he assumed the presidency of the Russian Federation on December 31, 1999, has been his relentless effort to downsize the Western presence

BEIJING RAISES STAKES IN TURKMEN GAS GAME

On October 31, oil trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange soared to a record-high $95.08 a barrel for December delivery before settling to $94.53. As the Western energy market

OIC COULD MEDIATE BETWEEN TURKEY AND KURDS IN IRAQ

Amid the escalating tension between Ankara and Baghdad over the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) staging guerrilla attacks into Turkey from their bases in northern Iraq, one international organization might prove

UPROAR OVER ANDIJAN FADES AS EU WARMS TO TASHKENT

On October 17 European Union foreign ministers agreed to lift travel restrictions against Uzbek Defense Minister Ruslan Mirzayev, National Security chief Rustam Inoyatov, and six others, saying it was "with

WILL ASHGABAT ABANDON NEUTRALITY?

While Western powers compete to entice Turkmenistan’s new leadership to share access to the country’s munificent hydrocarbon resources, Moscow is pursing a longer-term goal by attempting to modify the country’s

ECONOMIC REALITIES DISCOURAGE BAIKONUR CLOSURE

The Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan has just finished a series of anti-terror exercises staged by Russia's National Anti-Terror Committee and the Federal Security Service (FSB), codenamed “Baikonur-Anti-Terror 2007” (Itar-Tass, September

POSSIBLE FOOD UNREST IN CENTRAL ASIA

Harvest yields below projected levels combined with rising prices have analysts watching events in Central Asia, wondering if increased food prices might trigger civic protests. Poor weather has combined with

RIVAL CASPIAN CANAL PROJECTS COMPETE FOR INVESTORS

Azerbaijan, one of the rising Caspian energy exporters, has dismissed a Russian proposition to renovate the Volga-Don Canal (Itar-Tass, June 19). Baku apparently favors a Kazakh proposal for a “Eurasia

ASTANA RECONSIDERS RUSSIAN USE OF BAIKONUR

Oil-rich Kazakhstan is taking a new look at its Soviet-era space facility at Baikonur, reconsidering Russian use of the facility as well as evaluating ways to develop it as an

TURKMENISTAN BACK IN FORMER USSR’S ORBIT

With the unexpected death of Turkmen-President-for-Life Saparmurat Niyazov on December 21, 2006, many Western governments believed that a new era of openness and access to the country’s natural gas deposits,

INDIA: A NEW PLAYER IN CENTRAL ASIA?

As Washington's relations with Kyrgyzstan go from bad to worse, especially since the December 6, 2006, shooting of Kyrgyz national Alexander Ivanov at the U.S. air base at Manas, a

Sino-Turkish Relations Beyond the Silk Road

Some fifty years ago, Chinese and Turkish troops actually fought one another on the battlefield; Turkey was the sole Muslim nation to send troops to South Korea under the United

Sino-Turkish Relations Beyond the Silk Road

Some fifty years ago, Chinese and Turkish troops actually fought one another on the battlefield; Turkey was the sole Muslim nation to send troops to South Korea under the United

MOSCOW MOVES TO RAISE PROFILE IN CENTRAL ASIA

Earlier this month the Collective Security Treaty Organization held the third element of its “Rubezh” (Frontier) command staff exercise in Tajikistan. The CSTO was established after the collapse of the

A NEW DAY FOR TURKMEN ENERGY

Even before the late Turkmen President Saparmurat Niyazov was buried last December, foreign government delegations were scrambling to meet with his successor, Gurbanguly Berdimukhamedov, either to get reassurance that earlier

TURKMENISTAN REJOINS THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY

Following the death of Turkmen President Saparmurat Niyazov on December 21, his successor, Gurbanguly Berdimukhamedov, is carefully opening his country’s Internet access to the outside world. Under Niyazov, Turkmenistan had

MOSCOW AND ROME INTENSIFY ECONOMIC RELATIONS

On March 13 Russian President Vladimir Putin and Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi began two days of talks in the Chigi Palace in the Italian Adriatic port of Bari. According

Sino-Turkish Relations Beyond the Silk Road

Some fifty years ago, Chinese and Turkish troops actually fought one another on the battlefield; Turkey was the sole Muslim nation to send troops to South Korea under the United

Sino-Turkish Relations Beyond the Silk Road

Some fifty years ago, Chinese and Turkish troops actually fought one another on the battlefield; Turkey was the sole Muslim nation to send troops to South Korea under the United

MOSCOW LAUNCHES MAJOR ANTI-CORRUPTION DRIVE

Moscow is slowly realizing that rampant corruption is sapping the country’s economic vitality and tarnishing its image among potential Western investors. This week United Russia’s Mikhail Grishankov, chair of the

Saudi Oil Facilities: Al-Qaeda’s Next Target?

At a time of record-high oil prices, analysts are beginning to consider the implications of possible terrorist attacks on Middle Eastern oil facilities. The crown jewel of these facilities is

The Threat to Iraqi Oil

Attacks on Iraqi oil pipelines throughout this week bring into sharp focus the difficulties faced by coalition forces who had planned to use oil revenues to help fund the war

Who’s Who at Guantanamo Bay

America's slippery road into international legal limbo began on November 13, 2001 – the day Northern Alliance troops captured Kabul from Taliban forces. That same day, George W. Bush issued

Libya and al-Qaeda: A Complex Relationship

The United States, until recently, had a tendency to see Libya's Muammar Qadhafi and Osama bin Laden as ideological soul mates. While bin Laden aspired to cleanse Arabia and the

How And Why: The 9-11 Attacks On America

As America looks back on the devastating terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, the biggest unanswered question is "why?" In the immediate aftermath of the violence Al-Qaida never addressed the

SINO-KYRGYZ RELATIONS AFTER THE TULIP REVOLUTION

Of all the countries in Central Asia, post-revolution Kyrgyzstan seems to be the most likely candidate for closer bilateral ties with China. When Kyrgyz President Askar Akayev abruptly fled Bishkek

LIBYA AND AL-QAEDA: A COMPLEX RELATIONSHIP

The United States, until recently, had a tendency to see Libya's Muammar Qadhafi and Osama bin Laden as ideological soul mates. While bin Laden aspired to cleanse Arabia and the

China And Japan Race For Russian Crude

As the situation in the Middle East continues to deteriorate, from car bombings in Riyadh to pipeline attacks in Iraq, two Asian energy-deprived superpowers are nervously eyeing the developing chaos

WHO’S WHO AT GUANTANAMO BAY

America's slippery road into international legal limbo began on November 13, 2001 – the day Northern Alliance troops captured Kabul from Taliban forces. That same day, George W. Bush issued

The Threat To Iraqi Oil

Attacks on Iraqi oil pipelines throughout this week bring into sharp focus the difficulties faced by coalition forces who had planned to use oil revenues to help fund the war

The Dragon’s Drive For Caspian Oil

China's insatiable energy thirst is causing it to undertake a global search for energy supplies to sustain its booming economy. Beijing has injected itself into the complex Caspian chess match

How And Why – The 9-11 Attacks On America

As America looks back on the devastating terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, the biggest unanswered question is "why?" In the immediate aftermath of the violence Al-Qaida never addressed the

Al Qaeda And Maritime Terrorism, Part I

Fears of atomic smuggling in ships date back to the very dawn of the atomic age. On August 2, 1939, Albert Einstein wrote a letter to President Franklin Roosevelt informing

The Latin Connection

In the aftermath of the devastating September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks against the United States, international attention swiftly focused on a most unlikely place in the Western hemisphere--la Triple Frontera,

The Latin Connection

In the aftermath of the devastating September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks against the United States, international attention swiftly focused on a most unlikely place in the Western hemisphere--la Triple Frontera,

Al Qaeda And Maritime Terrorism, Part I

Fears of atomic smuggling in ships date back to the very dawn of the atomic age. On August 2, 1939, Albert Einstein wrote a letter to President Franklin Roosevelt informing